Ghana ready to strengthen ties with Jamaica.

 
THE JAMAICAN Government is being urged by two high-ranking Ghanian officials to move with dispatch to appoint a long-term consul in the oil-rich nation.

King Nii Kpobi Tettey, Tsuru III, ruler of the traditional state and vice-president of the Greater Accra House of Chiefs, told The Gleaner that Ghana stands ready to consolidate stronger economic ties with Jamaica, with which it enjoys excellent relations.
He said while a Ghanian consulate exists in Jamaica, this is not reciprocated in the West African country. "We need to move forward with urgency, as we have cultural and historical ties, including 'Brer Anancy' as a folk hero," he said.


King Nii, who stressed that Jamaica and Ghana share similar challenges with the transportation sector, was supported by former Ghanian Minister Amarkai Amarteifio, who accompanied the King on a five-day visit to Jamaica.
Amarteifio stressed that it was critically important for the Jamaican Government to establish a consulate in Ghana.
"This would improve and expand the opportunities for trade of several items in Jamaica and create more acceptable air trafficking from the Caribbean to West Africa".

King Nii told The Gleaner that Ghanians equipped with a strong historical knowledge of the contributions of Jamaicans to the development of Ghana, which today enjoys a buoyant economy, are highly respectful and appreciative of Jamaicans.
He suggested that a lack of knowledge among Jamaicans has blocked a better understanding of the relations that were forged nearly two centuries ago, from which Ghanians still benefit.
Last week, King Nii, on his first visit to the island, conferred on Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller an honorary citizenship award for her 40 years of public service to Jamaica.


Role of ambassador of Jamaica
The King promised to assume the role of ambassador of Jamaica in Ghana for the deepening of relations between the two countries.
He declared that the nationalism and Pan-Africanism philosophy of Jamaica's national hero Marcus Garvey is well regarded and acclaimed in Ghana.

King Nii also pointed to Jamaican doctor Cecily Williams, who introduced to Ghana the disease caused by malnutrition that is described in that country as 'kwashiorkor'.
He suggested that there was a plethora of similarities between the two countries that could be a starting point of forging a deeper bond.
For one, King Nii suggested that Jamaica and Ghana could benefit from arrangements related to their respective tourism products.

The King, who spent the weekend on the north coast with his host, noted local advertiser Arnold Foote, had high praise for Jamaica's tourism product.
He described Foote, President of the World Federation of Consuls, as a philanthropist extraordinaire. "He has, for the past seven years, associated himself with the efforts to strengthen the cultural and historical relations between Ghana and Jamaica during a visit to our country in 2008".
King Nii said Foote has earned a status of honorary chief and is recognised by the Ghanian Government as Nana Kobinio Manso of the Assin Royal Kingdom.

Tourism marketing extended to Ghana
He suggested that tourism marketing should be extended to that section of the world, while Ghana could learn a great deal from the Jamaicans to develop its product. "The beaches are similar, but we have not managed to do as well with them," he said.

Describing Ghana as the "motherland" for Jamaica, the King said Jamaica was viewed in Ghana as a hero nation because of the contributions of several Jamaican Presbyterian missionaries to his country 171 years ago.
There is even a village in Ghana that is called 'Jamaica' because of the "significant contributions" of Jamaicans to the development of that country. "Asburi Girls School was established near the village of Jamaica in the Akwapim Mountains many years later," he said.

The school has produced very important famous ladies serving in important positions all over the world.
King NII cited the current adviser to the president of Ghana, Dr Christie Amoako, and Hannah Afufi Briton, who acted as Ambassador to Sweden in Uganda in 2001.
It has not escaped the king that Rita Marley, the widow of late reggae icon Bob Marley, has relocated to her Ghanian roots and built a home near the village of Jamaica in Aburi.

Source:
 Jamaica Gleaner Company

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